8 Things Startup Founders Should Know Before Writing a Book 

Written by Sophia Clark

 You have started your own business and now may be considered a person who has succeeded at least at one sphere of life? Want to open new horizons or simply want to explain your company mission? Write a book. If you don’t know where to start, we have collected some tips for you to follow.

#1 Write for the Right Reason

It is hard to deny that your goals and motives are very important for one’s success. Curiously, money is never a good goal. You need a big idea to make your startup work. The same thing is with writing. You will never sell a book if all you want is to sell it. But if it is written for a higher goal and with feeling – it will sell itself. Besides money, you should never write out of mere vanity. If someone else’s fame keeps you restless, you will never be a good writer.

#2 Be Realistic

Before you start an actual book, try yourself as a writer in smaller things, like social …

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Notes on eBook Structure – Get It Right the First Time

This is an excerpt from ACE YOUR EBOOK

How will you structure your book? The array of options may seem daunting, even infinite at first. But they are not. Here is a menu for you. You can’t choose all of them, but you can mix two or more to present a successful narrative that will make your readers happy.

Personal story

The most compelling stories (for most readers) are personal. Let’s call this one the biographical approach to your book. If you have a compelling personal story that includes some key learnings about your industry, work, or your life, telling it as a chronological tale might work well for you. If you choose this option, remember this: Telling a personal narrative doesn’t mean you must begin at the beginning and end at the end. Most successful biographical movies start with a crisis point in the main character’s life to set the scene and hook the viewer, and then after that they flash back to the beginning of the story. They do not begin at the beginning.

Collection …

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Investing in Startups – Pitching Is Personal

Pitching is personal. We can crunch the numbers, scrutinize résumés, and ask the difficult financial questions, but at the end of the day, decisions will be made on intangibles—gut responses and feelings that move founders to create and pitch and angels to act.

Why are these emotional intangibles center stage?

Consider for a moment how risky angel investing really is. It’s highly illiquid. Your money can be parked in the investment for a long time, possibly eight to ten years. That’s a long stretch to wait to see the fruits of your labor. You need to do a ton of research on each and every investment you make, and the startups you look at often have little or no financial history—only projections into an uncertain future.

If it’s so risky, why keep doing it? “Because it’s addictive,” says Ross Blankenship, an angel investor and startup coach. “It’s enrapturing to see a company that was valued at $2 million and then it becomes a public company, now worth $4 billion. I mean, just from a financial standpoint, that’s awesome.” Success …

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